COVID-19 Vaccines in Pregnancy: Myths Vs. Facts

Pregnant Woman

Protecting yourself against COVID-19 by getting vaccinated is a big decision for everyone. If you are pregnant, trying to become pregnant or are breastfeeding, the decision becomes even heavier. It’s scientifically proven that getting the COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to protect you and your baby from getting extremely sick and having pregnancy complications or premature births.

Here are some of the most common myths vs. facts surrounding the COVID-19 vaccine among those who are pregnant, trying to become pregnant or are breastfeeding.

Myth:

I’m experiencing a high-risk or complicated pregnancy so I shouldn’t get vaccinated right now.

Fact:

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), even with no health concerns or complications, those who are pregnant are already at a higher risk of severe illness and hospitalization if they get COVID-19 and are not vaccinated. If you are having a complicated or high-risk pregnancy, it becomes even more important to be protected with the vaccine. So far, more than 30,000 pregnancies have been reported to V-SAFE (safety monitoring system) and have shown no major health concerns after receiving the vaccine.

The best thing you can do is talk to your trusted OB/GYN or doctor. It is their job and mission to make sure you and your baby are as safe as possible throughout your journey. They will be happy to give you the best information with your best interest at heart.

Myth:

There’s no point in getting vaccinated because me and my baby can still get COVID-19 and pass it to others.

Fact:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states studies are proving people who are not vaccinated are eight times more likely to get COVID-19 than those who are vaccinated. They are also 25 times more likely to experience hospitalization or death. Someone who isn’t vaccinated is much more likely to spread it to others. There is still a small chance of someone getting or spreading the virus even if they’re vaccinated. This happens with all vaccines; it’s not just the COVID-19 vaccine.

Myth:

It isn’t safe to get vaccinated if I’m breastfeeding.

Fact:

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics highly recommend breastfeeding individuals be vaccinated against COVID-19. The antibodies from the vaccine will be passed down through your milk, which can help your baby fight off the virus.

Myth:

The vaccine can affect my fertility.

Fact:

The American Academy of Pediatrics states these claims have been scientifically disproven with no found evidence or reports among the tens of thousands of clinical trial participants or the millions of those who have been vaccinated.

Myth:

I already had COVID-19, so my natural immunity will protect me while I’m pregnant.

Fact:

According to the CDC, while studies are showing the body can create antibodies to protect itself from reinfection, it is unclear how well and how long they can last. It is currently suspected to be around 90 days. It is also becoming evident that natural antibodies don’t work for all people in the same ways. The most guaranteed thing you can do is get vaccinated for future protection.

Getting vaccinated if you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant is understandably a big decision. If you are still unsure, it is important to talk to your doctor or OB/GYN. They are in their field because they care about the health and wellbeing of others and they truly want to provide you with the best information to keep you and your baby safe and healthy.

For more information about pregnancy, breastfeeding and the COVID-19 vaccine, visit the website sources healthcare professionals also trust and rely on:

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: cdc.gov
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: acog.org
  • American Academy of Pediatrics: aap.org
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